WineAlign

Find the right wine at the right price, right now.

Top Values at the LCBO (July 2016)

Your Guide to the Best Values, Limited Time Offers & Bonus Air Miles selections at the LCBO
by Steve Thurlow

Steve Thurlow

Steve Thurlow

It is mid-summer and so it’s a quiet time at LCBO for activities like delists and promotions but new wines have still been arriving and I have been busy tasting them as well as sampling some new vintages of existing listings.

As a consequence I am pleased to tell you that it is another exciting month for my Top 50 Best Values with six wines joining the list since I last wrote to you.

I also write about another wine that is brand new to the LCBO. It is great when a wine is added to the system and, without any discounts,  jumps straight onto the list. Congrats again to the smart buyers at the LCBO.

These are the usual reasons for wines joining the Top 50 Best Values list. There are also another five wines on the list that all have lots of Bonus AirMiles (BAMs) for the next 4 weeks, making them a little more attractive.

Steve’s Top Values are best buys among the 1600 or so wines in LCBO Wines and the Vintages Essentials Collection which I select from wines on Steve’s Top 50, a standing WineAlign list based on quality/price ratio. You can read below in detail how the Top 50 works, but it does fluctuate as new wines arrive and as discounts show up through Limited Time Offers (LTOs).

The discount period runs until August 14th.  So don’t hesitate. Thanks to WineAlign’s inventory tracking, I can assure you that there were stocks available, when we published, of every wine that I highlight.

Editors Note: You can find our complete critic reviews by clicking on any of the wine names, bottle images or links highlighted. Paid subscribers to WineAlign see all critic reviews immediately. Non-paid users wait 60 days to see new reviews. Membership has its privileges; like first access to great value wines!

Reds

Tini Sangiovese 2014, Romagna, Italy ($7.75) – This is a drinkable soft clean Italian red for pizza, pasta and risotto. It is dry and fruity with enough tannin and acidity for balance and very decent length considering the price. The finish is a little lean and a bit tart, but for the money, not bad.

Running With Bulls Tempranillo 2013, Wrattonbully, South Australia ($10.95 was $11.95) Delisted – This is a full-bodied powerful fruity red with smoke and spice from oak and some herbal tones and a dash of raspberry jam. The palate is juicy and fully flavoured with a long fruity finish. Very good length. Drink cautiously before running with bulls. Over 800 bottles remain.

Boschendal The Pavillion Shiraz Cabernet Sauvignon 2014, Stellenbosch, South Africa ($12.05) – A very juicy full bodied red with an appealing nose and lots of fruit that is balanced by soft tannin and soft acidity. Good focus and very good length. Try with lamb kebabs.

Santa Carolina Cabernet Sauvignon Reserva 2014, Colchagua Valley, Chile ($12.95 + 8 BAMs) – This is a pure fresh elegant wine with complexity and structure that usually costs a lot more. It has a youthful nose and very even palate which is finely balanced with excellent length. Enjoy with fine cuisine.

Tini Sangiovese 2014Running With Bulls Tempranillo 2013Boschendal The Pavillion Shiraz Cabernet Sauvignon 2014Santa Carolina Cabernet Sauvignon Reserva 2014

KWV Cathedral Cellar Cabernet Sauvignon 2014, Western Cape South Africa ($13.45 was $15.95) – This cabernet shows classic Cape minerality which lightens the palate and nose giving the impression of freshness. It is full bodied with excellent length. Try with a steak.

Argento Reserva Malbec 2014, Mendoza, Argentina ($13.95) – This is a big powerfully flavoured malbec with a freshness and elegance to nose and palate. It is very smooth, well balanced with a fruity dry finish. Try with a juicy duck breast.

The Wolftrap Syrah Mourvedre Viognier 2014, Western Cape, South Africa ($14.10 + 8 BAMs) – This is deeply coloured red blend that is medium to full bodied with firm tannin which gives a nice edge to the finish. Very good to excellent length. Best 2015 to 2019. Try with grilled red meats.

Taylor Fladgate Late Bottled Vintage 2011, Douro Superior, Portugal ($18.10) – A rich powerful port with fresh sweet black berry fruit aromas with vanilla and floral notes. It is full bodied very rich with the 20% alcohol finely balanced by soft acidity. Try with hard mature cheese and dark chocolate.

Kwv Cathedral Cellar Cabernet Sauvignon 2014Argento Reserva Malbec 2014The Wolftrap Syrah Mourvedre Viognier 2014Taylor Fladgate Late Bottled Vintage 2011

Whites

Cavallina Grillo Pinot Grigio 2015, Sicily, Italy ($8.20) Grillo is one of my favourite Sicilian native grapes which, when blended here with pinot grigio, delivers a deeply flavoured well balanced white at a great price. It is fairly simple but well balanced with very good length. Don’t overchill and try with sautéed seafood.

Domaine Jean Bousquet White Blend 2015, Argentina ($12.00) – This is a very rich smooth white blend that is probably mostly chardonnay maybe with a splash of viognier. It is midweight and deeply flavoured with very good length. Try with roast white meats like pork or veal or rich mature cheddar cheese.

Goats do Roam White 2015, Coastal Region, South Africa ($12.00) – The aromatic Goats white is a blend of three Rhone whites grapes and  is quite classy smooth and flavourful considering its price.  Enjoy as an aperitif with pastry nibbles or try with roast poultry.

Domaine Chatelain Les Vignes De Saint Laurent L’Abbaye Pouilly Fumé 2015, Loire Valley, France ($20.30) – This is a very classy dry white that is crisp and elegant with a mineral core to nose and palate which is so typical of Pouilly-Fumé. It is 100% sauvignon blanc. Minerally rich and very elegant. Try with sauteed seafood.

Cavallina Grillo Pinot Grigio 2015Domaine Jean Bousquet White Blend 2015Goats Do Roam White 2015Domaine Chatelain Les Vignes De Saint Laurent L'abbaye Pouilly Fumé 2015

How does a wine get selected for the Top Value Report:

There are three ways that a wine gets into this monthly report of wines that are always in the stores either on the LCBO “General List” or the VINTAGES Essential Collection.

– On Sale (LTO’s or Limited Time Offers): Every four weeks the LCBO discounts around 200 wines I have looked through the current batch and have highlighted some of my favourites that offer better value at present…. so stock up now.

– Bonus Air Miles (BAM’s): If you collect Air Miles then you will be getting Bonus Air Miles on another 150 or so wines…a few of these have a special appeal for a while.

– Steve’s Top 50: Wines that have moved onto my Top 50 Best Values this month. This is on an-on going WineAlign selection that mathematically calculates value by comparing the price and rating of all the wines on the LCBO General List. You can access the report any time and read more about it now.

The Rest of Steve’s Top 50

Steve's Top Value WinesIn addition to the wines mentioned above, there are another 38 wines on the Top 50 list this month. So if you did not find all you need in this report, dip into the Top 50 LCBO and VINTAGES Essentials wines. There will surely be something inexpensive that suits your taste.

To be included in the Top 50 for value a wine must be inexpensive while also having a high score, indicating high quality. I use a mathematical model to make the Top 50 selections from the wines in our database. I review the list every month to include newly listed and recently tasted vintages of current listings as well as monitoring the value of those put on sale for a limited time.

Before value wine shopping remember to consult the Top 50 (Click on Wine => Top 50 Value Wines to be taken directly to the list), since it is always changing. If you find that there is a new wine on the shelf or a new vintage that we have not reviewed, let us know. Moreover if you disagree with our reviews, tell us please. And if you think our reviews are accurate, send us some feedback since it’s good to hear that you agree with us.

The Top 50 changes all the time, so remember to check before shopping. I will be back next month with more news on value arrivals to Essentials and the LCBO.

Cheers!

Steve Thurlow

Top 50 Value Wines
Wines on Limited Time Offer
Wines with Bonus Air Miles

Editors Note: You can find our complete critic reviews by clicking on any of the wine names, bottle images or links highlighted. Paid subscribers to WineAlign see all critic reviews immediately. Non-paid users wait 60 days to see new reviews. Membership has its privileges; like first access to great value wines!


Advertisement

Wine Country Ontario

Filed under: News, Wine, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Top Values at the LCBO (June 2016)

Your Guide to the Best Values, Limited Time Offers & Bonus Air Miles selections at the LCBO
by Steve Thurlow

Steve Thurlow

Steve Thurlow

I spent the last week in BC with over 20 colleagues from WineAlign judging the 2016 edition of the National Wine Awards of Canada. Between us we tasted over 1500 wines in the competition plus many more at wineries we visited. It was a great exposure to the many good wines being made in Canada today.

I am now back in Ontario and am pleased to tell you that it is another exciting month for my Top 50 Best Values with twelve wines joining the list since I last wrote to you.

Some are de-listed favourites, others are discounted or have Bonus Air Miles that apply, making these wines even more attractive. I also write about some wines that are brand new to the LCBO. It is great when a wine is added to the system and, without any discounts, jumps straight onto the list. Bravo to the canny buyers at the LCBO.

Today’s report pulls best buys from Steve’s Top 50 which is a standing WineAlign list based on quality/price ratio of the 1600 or so wines in LCBO Wines and the VINTAGES Essentials Collection. You can read below in detail how the Top 50 works, but it does fluctuate as new wines arrive and as discounts show up through Limited Time Offers (LTOs).

The current discount period runs until July 17th. So don’t hesitate. Thanks to WineAlign’s inventory tracking, I can assure you that there were stocks available, when we published, of every wine that I highlight.

Editors Note: You can find our complete critic reviews by clicking on any of the wine names, bottle images or links highlighted. Paid subscribers to WineAlign see all critic reviews immediately. Non-paid users wait 60 days to see new reviews. Membership has its privileges; like first access to great value wines!

Reds

Running With Bulls Tempranillo 2013, Wrattonbully, South Australia ($10.95 was $11.95) Delisted – This is a full-bodied powerful fruity red with smoke and spice from oak and some herbal tones and a dash of raspberry jam. The palate is juicy and fully flavoured with a long fruity finish. Very good length. Drink cautiously before running with bulls. Over 2300 bottles remain.

Trapiche Malbec Reserve 2014, Mendoza, Argentina ($10.95 was $11.95) – An elegant fruity structured wine for fine dining. It is medium bodied and dry with soft mature tannin and well integrated acidity delivering a gentle velvety smooth palate. Try with roast beef. Very good length.

Running With Bulls Tempranillo 2013 Trapiche Malbec Reserve 2014 Solaz Tempranillo Cabernet Sauvignon 2014

Solaz Tempranillo Cabernet Sauvignon 2014, Castilla León, Spain ($11.65) – This is juicy vibrant clean red with fresh raspberry and red cherry aromas with good focus and very good length with an intense fruity finish. Chill lightly and enjoy with BBQ meats.

Santa Carolina Carmenère Reserva 2014, Cachapoal Valley, Chile ($11.95 + 8BAMs) – Carmenere is rapidly becoming the signature grape of Chile where they have now mastered this difficult grape. It is a dense powerful wine that is full bodied but still very juicy with ripe fruit and fine tannin. Very good length.

Santa Carolina Carmenère Reserva 2014 Ogier Cotes Du Ventoux Red 2013 Masi Tupungato Passo Doble Malbec Corvina 2013

Ogier Cotes du Ventoux Red 2013, Rhone Valley, France ($11.95) – This is a soft spicy red with raspberry, grapefruit and cherry fruit aromas and white pepper spiciness on nose and palate. It is mid-weight with soft tannin and very good length. Try with a grilled lamb cutlets.

Masi Tupungato Passo Doble Malbec Corvina 2013, Mendoza, Argentina ($14.10 was $14.95) – The Masi team that has crafted a savoury acid driven style of wine that is eminently food friendly. So do not expect mocha and chocolate laced ripe berry fruit; this is more Bordeauxlike than what Mendoza’s Uco Valley often delivers and I like it a lot.

Whites

Cavallina Grillo Pinot Grigio 2015, Sicily, Italy ($8.20) Grillo is one of my favourite Sicilian native grapes which, when blended here with pinot grigio, delivers a deeply flavoured well balanced white at a great price. It is fairly simple but well balanced with very good length. Don’t overchill and try with sautéed seafood.

Mascota Vineyards O P I Chardonnay 2014, Argentina ($10.95 was $12.95) – This is lightly oaked to give some added complexity and structure and very smooth with a mineral tone to the fruit. Very good to excellent length with a dry finish. Try with creamy pasta sauces.

Cavallina Grillo Pinot Grigio 2015 Mascota Vineyards O P I Chardonnay 2014 Domaine Jean Bousquet White Blend 2015

Domaine Jean Bousquet White Blend 2015 Argentina ($12.00) – This is a very rich smooth white blend that is probably mostly chardonnay maybe with a splash of viognier. It is midweight and deeply flavoured with very good length. Try with roast white meats like pork or veal or rich mature cheddar cheese.

Goats do Roam White 2015, Coastal Region, South Africa ($12.00) – The aromatic Goats white is a blend of three Rhone whites grapes and  is quite classy smooth and flavourful considering its price.  Enjoy as an aperitif with pastry nibbles or try with roast poultry.

Goats Do Roam White 2015 Lacheteau Sauvignon Blanc 2014 Malivoire Chardonnay 2013

Lacheteau Sauvignon Blanc 2014, Touraine, Loire Valley, France ($14.10 + 5BAMs) – This is an elegant flavourful sauvignon with good varietal character that is midweight and quite rich with lots of flavour and fine balancing acidity. Very good length. Try with herbed chicken.

Malivoire Chardonnay 2013, VQA Niagara Peninsula, Ontario ($17.95 was $19.95) – This is a very classy white with a beautiful soft creamy texture and vibrant zesty acidity that is finely balanced and midweight with the fruit graced by minerality on the finish. Try with mildly flavoured poultry or seafood dishes. Happy Canada Day!

How does a wine get selected for the Top Value Report:

There are three ways that a wine gets into this monthly report of wines that are always in the stores either on the LCBO “General List” or the VINTAGES Essential Collection.

– On Sale (LTO’s or Limited Time Offers): Every four weeks the LCBO discounts around 200 wines I have looked through the current batch and have highlighted some of my favourites that offer better value at present…. so stock up now.

– Bonus Air Miles (BAM’s): If you collect Air Miles then you will be getting Bonus Air Miles on another 150 or so wines…a few of these have a special appeal for a while.

– Steve’s Top 50: Wines that have moved onto my Top 50 Best Values this month. This is on an-on going WineAlign selection that mathematically calculates value by comparing the price and rating of all the wines on the LCBO General List. You can access the report any time and read more about it now.

The Rest of Steve’s Top 50

Steve's Top Value WinesIn addition to the wines mentioned above, there are another 38 wines on the Top 50 list this month. So if you did not find all you need in this report, dip into the Top 50 LCBO and VINTAGES Essentials wines. There will surely be something inexpensive that suits your taste.

To be included in the Top 50 for value a wine must be inexpensive while also having a high score, indicating high quality. I use a mathematical model to make the Top 50 selections from the wines in our database. I review the list every month to include newly listed and recently tasted vintages of current listings as well as monitoring the value of those put on sale for a limited time.

Before value wine shopping remember to consult the Top 50 (Click on Wine => Top 50 Value Wines to be taken directly to the list), since it is always changing. If you find that there is a new wine on the shelf or a new vintage that we have not reviewed, let us know. Moreover if you disagree with our reviews, tell us please. And if you think our reviews are accurate, send us some feedback since it’s good to hear that you agree with us.

The Top 50 changes all the time, so remember to check before shopping. I will be back next month with more news on value arrivals to Essentials and the LCBO.

Cheers!

Steve Thurlow

Top 50 Value Wines
Wines on Limited Time Offer
Wines with Bonus Air Miles

Editors Note: You can find our complete critic reviews by clicking on any of the wine names, bottle images or links highlighted. Paid subscribers to WineAlign see all critic reviews immediately. Non-paid users wait 60 days to see new reviews. Membership has its privileges; like first access to great value wines!


AdvertisementWine Country Ontario

Filed under: News, Wine, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Alerte Cellier : les bons choix de nos experts pour l’arrivage du 9 juin

Le deuxième relâchement du dernier arrivage Cellier avant l’été arrive en succursales aujourd’hui, le 9 juin. Vers quels vins se tourner ? Marc Chapleau et Nadia Fournier nous indiquent ici lesquels ils ont préféré.

Il y a de quoi se faire plaisir

Marc a retenu, en blanc, l’étonnant Morgante Nero d’Avola Bianco 2014 (18,90 $), généreux et rafraîchissant — et la preuve, encore une fois, que la Sicile a bien des atouts dans sa manche.

Morgante Nero d'Avola Bianco 2014 Domaine Gouffier Clos L'évêque Mercurey 1er Cru 2014 Copains Tous Ensemble Syrah 2013 Les Mines Grand Clos 2012

Puis, en rouge, du plus léger au plus corsé : le Domaine Gouffier Clos L’évêque Mercurey 1er Cru 2014 (38,75 $), très bon bourgogne passablement boisé mais avec une bonne masse de fruit par ailleurs, ainsi que de la tension, du nerf ; de Californie, le Copains Tous Ensemble Syrah Mendocino 2013 (36,75 $) encore très jeune, tout d’une pièce, à attendre encore un an ou deux, mais la qualité de son fruit est indéniable, tous les espoirs sont permis. Enfin, d’Espagne, de Catalogne plus précisément, le costaud Les Mines Grand Clos Priorat 2012 a du caractère, il est bien boisé mais aussi bien tonique, avec de la profondeur et de la complexité, et une belle fraîcheur également. Et il ne coûte que 22,10 $ !

Elio Altare Dolcetto D'alba 2014Château Langlais Puisseguin Saint Émilion 2000Domaine Baud Cuvée Flor Côtes Du Jura 2014

Tout comme Marc, Nadia a beaucoup aimé le Bianco di Morante 2014, issu de nero d’avola, mais vinifié en blanc. Une curiosité sicilienne vendue à un prix attrayant. Toujours en Italie, mais tout au nord du pays, le Dolcetto d’Alba 2014 d’Elio Altare est un modèle de race et d’équilibre; velouté, persistant, savoureux. De facture plus classique, un bordeaux, le Château Langlais 2000, Puisseguin-St-Émilion, biologique et maintenant âgé de près de 16 ans; le charme dépouillé d’un vin parfaitement à point, avec des accents de champignon et des tanins polis par les années. Le genre de bouteille que tout amateur devrait avoir goûté avant de commencer une cave de garde. Enfin, les amateurs de vins du Jura ne voudront pas manquer l’arrivée du Chardonnay 2012, Cuvée Flor du Domaine Baud. Pas très concentré, mais digeste, original et de bonne tenue. À 20 $, un bon achat.

Bons achats !

~

La fonction Cellier

Nouvel arrivage CELLIERAfin de vous guider encore mieux dans vous achats et faciliter vos emplettes, nous avons ajouté une fonction spéciale au site Chacun son vin pour nos membres Privilège.

Chaque fois que la SAQ met en vente ces nouveaux arrivages, vous n’aurez qu’à visiter notre site et cliquer sur l’onglet «Vin» puis sur «Nouvel arrivage Cellier», dans le menu déroulant. Aussi simple que cela !

Vous pourrez ainsi lire les notes de dégustation sur tous les vins du CELLIER, en un seul et même endroit.

Note de la rédaction: Cet accès exclusif, ainsi que la possibilité de lire dès leur publication tous les commentaires de dégustation publiés sur Chacun son Vin, est offert à nos membres Privilège pour la somme de 40 $ par année. (Les membres inscrits bénéficiant d’un accès gratuit doivent, pour leur part, attendre 60 jours avant de pouvoir accéder à tout notre contenu.)


Filed under: News, Wine, , , , , , , , , ,

Les bons choix de Nadia – L’été des rosés

Éloge de la buvabilité
par Nadia Fournier

Nadia Fournier

Nadia Fournier

Chaque lundi matin, presque religieusement, je lis Andrew Jefford. J’aime son propos tout en nuances. J’aime la justesse de ses observations sur le monde du vin.

Lundi dernier, dans son billet hebdomadaire publié sur le site du magazine britannique Decanter, Jefford y allait d’une Lettre ouverte à un jeune dégustateur, à qui il prodiguait quelques conseils, rappelant d’abord que le vin, avant toute chose, est fait pour être bu, pas dégusté.

Il abordait aussi le thème de la concentration, soulignant qu’il s’agit quant à lui d’une vertu surévaluée, puisqu’elle peut aisément être générée de manière artificielle. Il introduisait aussi la notion encore un peu floue de « buvabilité »  (“drinkability” dans le texte).

« La buvabilité, est une preuve – peut-être la preuve la plus significative – de l’harmonie, une vertu esthétique cardinale. »

Les chroniques d’Andrew Jefford sont toujours pertinentes et agréables à lire, mais celle-ci m’a d’autant plus interpellée que je l’ai lue au moment même où je rédigeais mes notes sur les rosés de l’été 2016.

À une époque où le vin est trop souvent mesuré selon des critères de puissance et de concentration, plusieurs en viennent obligatoirement à considérer le rosé comme un vin maigre, une sorte de rouge raté. C’est drôle, mais pour moi, c’est précisément le contraire. Je vois dans le rosé une leçon de minimalisme et de retenue.

Par définition, il a moins de couleur, moins de corps et moins de tanins qu’un vin rouge, mais il ne faut pas le juger ou l’apprécier sur ces critères. Un bon rosé classique se fait avant tout  valoir par sa délicatesse, sa pureté et son équilibre. Ce n’est pas un vin de dégustation, mais un vin de soif, une boisson de plaisir à savourer sans trop intellectualiser.

Cette année, la SAQ a quelque peu corrigé les lacunes des derniers étés en important une belle sélection de vins rosés de France et d’ailleurs dans le monde. Pour vous accompagner tout au long de la belle saison, voici mes favoris. Tous élaborés avec sérieux, mais à boire sans complexe. C’est l’été, relaxez!

La Provence, toujours la Provence

Il y a plus de 2500 ans, les Grecs produisaient du vin entre Marseille et Nice. Comme le vin rouge n’a été inventé qu’au 17e siècle, on en déduit qu’il s’agissait certainement du rosé. Le rosé n’est donc pas une création commerciale moderne, mais un pur produit de la tradition provençale, au même titre que le pastis et la pétanque. Aujourd’hui, il compte encore pour 88 % de toute la production viticole régionale.

Pour la première fois à la SAQ, le Côtes de Provence du Domaine Jacourette Sainte-Victoire 2015 (19,30 $), est un bel exemple du genre. Typiquement provençal, tout à fait sec, mais issu de raisins mûrs et gorgés de soleil; un heureux mariage de gras et de minéralité, garante de vitalité.

Domaine Jacourette Sainte Victoire Vin Rosé 2015Miraval Rosé 2015 Château La Tour De L'evêque Pétale De Rose Rosé 2015 Vieux Château D'astros 2015 Domaine Houchart Rosé 2015

Dans la lignée des derniers millésimes, le rosé 2015 du Château de Miraval (21,15 $) affiche une couleur très pâle; sec et un peu nerveux, sa texture rappelle celle d’un vin blanc de Provence.

Quoique moins aromatique que par le passé, le Pétale de Rose 2015 (21,65 $), grand classique provençal, est une autre belle réussite pour Régine Sumeire. Les inconditionnels y retrouveront la texture vineuse et les saveurs délicates qui ont fait son succès.

Plus abordable, les rosés du Vieux Château d’Astros et Domaine Houchart (17,50 $) sont un peu moins complets, mais dotés d’un bon équilibre d’ensemble. Tout à fait recommandables à moins de 20 $.

Le reste de la France

En France, la consommation de vin rosé ne cesse de progresser et a quasiment triplé depuis 1990. L’engouement pour le rosé dépasse les frontières de l’Hexagone puisqu’au cours des 10 dernières années, on notait une progression de l’ordre de 15 % à l’échelle mondiale. Même si la Provence fournit 35 % de la production nationale de vin rosé, d’autres régions de France s’y consacrent avec sérieux.

Stylistiquement à mi-chemin entre un rosé et un vin rouge léger, le Rosé 2015, Côtes Catalanes (18,40 $) de Ferrer-Ribière est tout à fait typique d’un rosé du Roussillon: très coloré, généreusement fruité, avec une excellente tenue. Le parfait exemple d’un rosé conçu pour la table et vendu à un prix attrayant.
Tout aussi coloré, le Tavel 2015 du Domaine du Vieil Aven (18,90 $) a toute la structure et l’intensité aromatique attendues dans un vin de cette appellation rhodanienne. Pour l’apprécier à sa juste valeur, servez le à table.

Domaine Ferrer Ribière Vin Rosé 2015Domaine Du Vieil Aven Tavel 2015 Domaine Du Pegau Rosé 2015 Buti Nages Vin Rosé 2015 Château De Lancyre Rosé 2015Chartier Créateur D'harmonies Le Rosé 2015

Également du Rhône mais dans un tout autre registre, le Pink 2015, Vin de Table du Domaine du Pégau (20,45 $) risque de laisser sur leur soif les amateurs de rosé fruité et facile puisqu’il présente des odeurs animales inhabituelles, avec une fin de bouche quelque peu astringente. Malgré cela, un très bon vin original qui pourra donner de beaux accords à table. Arrivée prévue vers la mi-juin.

Le Buti Nages 2015 (15,95 $) de Michel Gassier est tout à fait à la hauteur des attentes cette année encore. Tout comme le Pic St-Loup 2015 du Château de Lancyre (17,45 $); l’un des bons rosés de l’été dans le réseau. Très sec et de couleur pâle, il offre une bonne tenue en bouche et des saveurs plus près du minéral que du fruit. Aussi expressif en bouche qu’au nez, Le Rosé 2015 (19 $) de François Chartier ne déçoit pas; de bons goûts de fruits rouges et de fleurs blanches, portés par une texture nourrie.

Et le reste du monde

Dans le même esprit de fraîcheur et de légèreté que les meilleurs rosés de Provence, le Dão Rosé 2015 d’Alvaro Castro (18,40 $) est impeccable! Une minéralité qui appelle la soif, des saveurs fruitées très nettes et un léger reste de gaz qui confère une agréable fraîcheur à l’ensemble.

Produit par la même cave coopérative que le célèbre Monasterio de las Viñas, le El Circo, Payaso 2015, Carinena a tout le naturel fruité de la garnacha, sans sucre ni saveurs bonbon. Rien de complexe, mais vendu à prix juste. (11,90 $)

Alvaro Castro Dao Vin Rosé 2015 El Circo Payaso Carinena 2015 Terre Rouge Vin Gris D'amador Rosé 2014Le Rosé Gabrielle Vignoble Rivière Du Chêne Vin Rosé 2015 Domaine St Jacques Rosé 2015

Terminons par ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique avec le Terre Rouge Vin Gris d’Amador 2014, un rosé californien composé de grenache et de mourvèdre. Un vin idéal pour la table; à retenir pour sa texture, plus que pour son fruité juvénile.

Du Québec, Le Rosé Gabrielle 2015 (16,05 $) du Vignoble Rivière du Chêne est tout aussi recommandable dans sa version 2015. Sec, agrémenté de goûts de fruits des bois et tonifié par une bonne dose d’acidité, ce qui le rendra d’autant plus agréable à l’apéro.

Et je laisse le mot de la fin au Rosé 2015 du Domaine St-Jacques qui reprend non seulement le dessus après un certain fléchissement en 2014, mais qui m’a semblé plus achevé que jamais. Moins coloré que par le passé, il offre toujours une bonne tenue en bouche, avec un grain un peu plus fin, plus délicat et un fruité expressif. À ce prix, on achète sans hésiter.

Santé! Bon été!

 

Nadia Fournier

Note de la rédaction: vous pouvez lire les commentaires de dégustation complets en cliquant sur les noms de vins, les photos de bouteilles ou les liens mis en surbrillance. Les abonnés payants à Chacun son vin ont accès à toutes les critiques dès leur mise en ligne. Les utilisateurs inscrits doivent attendre 60 jours après leur parution pour les lire. L’adhésion a ses privilèges ; parmi ceux-ci, un accès direct à de bons vins !


Publicité

Castello di Gabbiano Riserva Chianti Classico 2012

Filed under: News, Wine, , , , , , , , ,

Bordeaux, France – Official Opening of La Cité du Vin

Spenser Massie, of Similkameen Valley’s Clos du Soleil winery was on the ground today in Bordeaux for the official opening of La Cité du Vin, a new museum based on the culture of wine. Massie was the Canadian representative for wineries from coast to coast, and the participating regional bodies. Here is a brief release from him ~ TR

Bordeaux, France – Official Opening of La Cité du Vin
May 31st, 2016

Canada’s fine wines and emerging regions were part of the excitement around the opening of La Cité du Vin today here in Bordeaux. French President Hollande, who opened this major new museum dedicated to wine and the world’s wine regions, noted that one-third of tourists who visit France come for wine and gastronomy.

©Anaka – La Cité du Vin

 

Spencer Massie, Founder of Clos du Soleil Winery in Keremeos BC, an artisan winery focused on a small production of ultra-high end fine wines, was in attendance at the Inaugural visit.

“It was fantastic for us to be invited here as an industry – based on the budding international recognition for the quality of wines coming from our country. Very honoured to be the Canadian representative, on behalf of all the wineries that participated in the vanguard of this relationship:

©Anaka – La Cité du VinBlack Hills Estate Winery – Okanagan Valley British Columbia
Cave Spring Cellars – Niagara Escarpment Ontario
Château Des Charmes – Niagara on the Lake Ontario
Clos du Soleil Winery – Similkameen Valley British Columbia
Culmina Family Estate Winery – Okanagan Valley British Columbia
Jackson-Triggs Okanagan Estate – Okanagan Valley British Columbia
Laughing Stock Vineyards – Okanagan Valley British Columbia
Legends Estates Winery – Niagara Escarpment Ontario
Nk’Mip Cellars– Okanagan Valley British Columbia
Painted Rock Winery – Okanagan Valley British Columbia
Pelee Island Winery – Pelee Island Ontario
Sea Star Winery – Gulf Islands British Columbia
Summerhill Pyramid Winery – Okanagan Valley British Columbia
Unsworth Winery – Vancouver Island British Columbia
Vignoble Carone – Lanaudière Valley Quebec
Vista D’Oro Winery – Fraser Valley British Columbia

These wineries stepped up to the plate on behalf of the industry and are hopefully just the initial wineries participating, with the objective of introducing the estimated 450,000 Wine Tourism visitors expected to visit La Cité annually, to learn about Canadian Wines, appreciate them, and eventually come visit us.”

Just north of the City of Bordeaux, this impressive, architecturally significant building set adjacent to the Garonne River is stunning – and reminiscent in form of a fine wine decanter. La Cité opens to the public tomorrow.

For more information http://www.laciteduvin.com/en

 


Filed under: Featured Articles, Wine, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Les bons choix de Nadia – Février 2016

De grands terroirs sous-estimés
par Nadia Fournier

Nadia Fournier

Nadia Fournier

Le monde du vin est vaste. De plus en plus vaste. L’année dernière, on recensait une soixantaine de pays producteurs. La France, l’Italie, les États-Unis et l’Espagne dans le peloton de tête; la Lettonie, le Kyrgyzstan et le Zimbabwe comme bons derniers.

Le Zimbabwe, quand même!

Malgré cette apparente diversité, j’ai l’impression de vous parler sans cesse des mêmes appellations, des mêmes vins. Évidemment, on ne peut réinventer la roue – qu’elle ait trois ou quatre boutons – à chaque chronique. Puis, comme notre travail consiste avant tout à vous guider dans vos achats, nos recommandations sont tributaires de l’offre à la SAQ.

La sélection du Cellier du mois de février, par exemple, est somme toute assez conservatrice. Outre quelques exceptions, l’offre se résume aux régions européennes classiques : Bordeaux, Madiran, Cahors, Sancerre, Barolo, Rioja, Douro et quelques vins de Toscane. Cela dit, bien que peu novatrice, la sélection compte de très bons achats, tous commentés plus bas.

Mais pour être certaine de ne pas vous laisser sur votre soif, je vous donne en prime quelques suggestions de vins abordables qui proviennent de régions encore trop souvent sous-estimées, sinon snobées.

À la vôtre!

Dão, Portugal 

Carvalhais Duque De Viseu Red 2013 Quinta Das Maias Dâo 2012Avec les investissements soutenus dont elle bénéficie depuis une vingtaine d’années, cette région qui a beaucoup souffert du monopole de coopératives instauré sous la dictature, est en voie de réhabilitation. Si les vins de table du Douro ont été la révélation portugaise des années 1990, ceux du Dão pourraient d’ailleurs être celle de la présente décennie.

Au Portugal, on entend souvent dire que les vins du Dão empruntent certains traits caractéristiques à ceux de la Bourgogne ou du Beaujolais. Fruité et goulayant, doté d’une certaine mâche tannique, tout en conservant une immense « buvabilité ». Le cépage touriga nacional n’a pourtant rien en commun avec le pinot noir ou le gamay et donne plutôt des vins puissants et tanniques dans le Douro. Mais sur les sols de granit du Dão, où il profite autant de la fraîcheur de l’océan atlantique que de celle des montagnes, il est la source de vins élégants et tout en nuances, comme le Quinta das Maias 2012, ou le Duque de Viseu 2013. Tous deux vendus sous la barre des 20 $. 

Muscadet, France

Depuis une dizaine d’années, les vins du Muscadet sont enfin sortis des limbes. grâce au travail d’une poignée de vignerons qui ont redonné leurs lettres de noblesse à ces vignobles situés au sud-est de Nantes. La région en avait grand besoin : le muscadet est sans doute l’un des vins blancs dont la réputation a le plus souffert de la vague industrielle qui a régné sur plusieurs vignobles de France après la seconde moitié du 20e siècle.

Soumis à des rendements immenses, le cépage local melon de bourgogne n’a longtemps donné que de petits vins vif et sans âme. Le muscadet constitue une excellente alternative économique pour les amateurs de vins blancs secs, non-boisés et désaltérant comme ceux de Chablis. Ses notes salines et minérales évoquent tantôt les coquilles d’huîtres, tantôt l’odeur de cailloux chauffés au soleil.

Les meilleurs vins de l’appellation peuvent aussi reposer en cave pendant une bonne dizaine d’années. Ils acquièrent alors des arômes des notes d’hydrocarbures et de cire d’abeille qui rappellent de vieux rieslings.

Guy Bossard (Domaine de l’Écu) a été l’un des premiers vignerons à redynamiser le Muscadet. Évoluant à contrecourant, il a en converti à l’agriculture biologique dès 1975, le domaine familial aujourd’hui géré de façon tout aussi rigoureuse par Fréderic Niger Van Herck. La cuvée Granite 2013 est l’un des beaux exemples du genre à la SAQ. 

Maule, Chili

Ce qui se passe en ce moment dans le vignoble chilien est fascinant. Un vent de renouveau souffle sur le pays depuis quelques années, entrainant sur son passage de nouvelles générations de vignerons. Rien à voir cependant avec la révolution technologique et oenologique qui avait permis de moderniser les méthodes de vinification dans les années 1980 et d’accroitre la concentration. Certains vous diront qu’il s’agit plutôt d’un retour en arrière : des raisins cueillis moins mûrs, moins d’interventions au chai et aussi moins de bois neuf.

Frappés par la sècheresse dans les régions viticoles les plus septentrionales, plusieurs acteurs importants de l’industrie viticole chilienne manifestent un intérêt croissant pour les régions de Maule et d’Itata. Les cépages carignan, cinsault et país – dont plusieurs vignes centenaires qui abondent dans ce secteur – sont maintenant pris au sérieux et donnent des vins aussi authentiques que délicieux.

Élaboré par Pedro Parra, chasseur de terroir et ambassadeur du renouveau chilien, le Clos des Fous Cauquenina 2013 est l’archétype du vrai vin de terroir. Issu de vignes âgées de 80 ans en moyenne (carignan, malbec, syrah, país, cinsault et carmenère) il évoque autant la terre que du fruit, par ses parfums de feuilles mortes et ses tanins un peu granuleux.

Domaine de L'ecu Granite 2013 Clos des Fous Cauquenina 2013 Kerpen Wehlener Sonnenuhr Riesling Spätlese Trocken 2014

Les riesling allemands… secs! 

Malgré la croyance populaire, tous les rieslings germaniques ne sont pas doux. À visiter les régions viticoles d’Allemagne, on pourrait même croire que les rieslings demi-secs sont une espèce menacée. Depuis une bonne trentaine d’années, les Allemands ont largement adopté les vins secs, dépourvus de sucre résiduel, au détriment de tout autre style de vin. En fait, la survie des riesling demi-sec tel qu’on les connait repose essentiellement sur la demande des acheteurs étrangers.

Au 19e siècle, les vins germaniques étaient plus secs que ceux de France et titraient jusqu’à 12,5 % d’alcool. Ce n’est qu’après la Première guerre mondiale que les vins ont commencé à évoluer vers un style demi-sec. Pour des raisons financières, les entreprises viticoles ont été contraintes d’accélérer le processus des vinifications. Ainsi, plutôt que de laisser le sucre présent dans le moût de raisins se transformer complétement en alcool – ce qui pouvait prendre un an voire plus, si la température extérieure ralentissait l’action des levures – plusieurs ont entrepris de bloquer la fermentation au printemps, lorsque les vins avaient encore une généreuse quantité de sucre résiduel. Ils pouvaient alors mettre le vin en bouteilles dès l’été et l’expédier avant la prochaine vendange.

Pour redécouvrir le riesling allemand sur un mode sec, vif et tranchant, goûtez le Riesling Trocken 2014 de la maison Kerpen, produit sur les des coteaux vertigineux du cru Wehlener Sonnenuhr, dans la Mittelmosel. Qu’un vin apte à vieillir et provenant d’un des plus grands terroirs viticoles de la planète coûte moins de 25 $ devrait suffire à vous convaincre de l’essayer. 

Cellier – Février 

En rafale, mes coups de cœur parmi les vins qui ont été mis en marché les 4 et 18 février dans le cadre du lancement du dernier Cellier. Pour consulter la liste complète des vins du dernier arrivage, commentés par Marc Chapleau, Bill Zacharkiw et moi, cliquez ICI.

Le Château Cormeil-Figeac, propriété de la famille Moreaud, fait face aux châteaux Figeac et Cheval-Blanc, à Saint-Émilion. En 2010, Coraline et Victor ont produit un vin harmonieux, franc et net, qui marie la rondeur du merlot à la vivacité du cabernet franc, avec un esprit de dépouillement qui fait le charme des bons bordeaux classiques. (38 $)

Château Cormeil Figeac 2010 Péraclos 2010 Michel Rolland Bordeaux 2010 Château La Fleur Pourret 2009 Château de Cenac Cuvée Prestige Malbec 2011

Le Péraclos 2010, Montagne Saint-Émilion offre une interprétation ambitieuse de ce terroir secondaire de la rive-droite. Encore jeune et marqué par l’élevage; compact et conçu pour plaire aux amateurs de vins costauds. (19,95 $) Nettement plus rond et accessible dès aujourd’hui, le Bordeaux 2010 de Michel Rolland est l’expression même d’un merlot mûr, gorgé de saveurs confites et porté par des tanins rond. (21,60 $) Dans le même registre, le Château La Fleur Pourret, Saint-Émilion grand cru 2009 affiche la générosité caractéristique du millésime. Le vin est cependant tissé de tanins assez fermes et n’accuse aucune lourdeur en bouche. (31 $)

Bon vin de Cahors issu à 100 % de malbec, le Château Cénac, Cahors 2011, Cuvée Prestige s’avère plus aromatique que concentré ou puissant. Droit et assez bien tourné. (17,50 $)

Dans le Piémont, Sergio Germano élabore des vins de facture moderne, qui mettent à contribution les barriques neuves. Son Barolo 2010 est gorgé de fruit et d’épices et soutenu par des tanins compacts. Encore jeune et très vigoureux, il devrait se bonifier d’ici 2018. (49,75 $)

Ettore Germano Barolo 2010 Marqués de Murrieta Finca Ygay Reserva 2010 Lavradores de Feitoria Douro 2013 Alves de Sousa Gaivosa Primeros Anos 2012 Guy Breton Régnié 2013

Célèbre pour sa cuvée Castillo Ygay Gran Reserva, Marques de Murrieta produit aussi une version Reserva commercialisée sous le simple nom de Ygay. Le Rioja Reserva 2010 est une belle bouteille à revoir dans 5-6 ans. (29,70 $) 

Disponible en très bonnes quantités dans le réseau et vendu pour moins de 15 $, le Lavradores de Feitoria, Douro 2013 ne titre que 13 % d’alcool, mais il a beaucoup de volume en bouche. À ce prix, on serait fou de s’en passer. (14,80 $) Un peu plus riche et boisé, le Gaivosa 2012, Primeros Anos, Douro est joufflu et assez rassasiant à sa manière. (20,95 $) 

Et pour terminer sur une note de légèreté, le Régnié 2013 de Guy Breton fera le plus grand bonheur des amoureux du gamay. Comme plusieurs vignerons de la région, Breton a fait ses classes aux côtés de Jules Chauvet, père du mouvement des vins naturels. Son Régnié est souple, coulant, gorgé de fruit et irrésistiblement digeste. (28,30 $)

Santé!

Nadia Fournier

Note de la rédaction: vous pouvez lire les commentaires de dégustation complets en cliquant sur les noms de vins, les photos de bouteilles ou les liens mis en surbrillance. Les abonnés payants à Chacun son vin ont accès à toutes les critiques dès leur mise en ligne. Les utilisateurs inscrits doivent attendre 60 jours après leur parution pour les lire. L’adhésion a ses privilèges ; parmi ceux-ci, un accès direct à de bons vins !


Publicité

Castello di Gabbiano Riserva Chianti Classico 2012

Filed under: News, Wine, , , , , , , , , , ,

Regions, sub-regions and appellations in France

The Caveman Speaks
by Bill Zacharkiw

Bill Zacharkiw: Image credit Jason Dziver

Bill Zacharkiw

If you have ever checked out a French wine label and have very little idea as to what everything means, I get it. It’s confusing stuff. Take the Burgundy region for example. Within the region of Burgundy, you will find 100 different appellations, which include regional appellations, village appellations, Premier and Grand Cru appellations, as well as lieux-dits and Monopoles.

To illustrate, Réné Bouvier’s Bourgogne, Le Chapitre, is a regional appellation (Bourgogne), while Jean-Claude Boisset’s Côte de Nuits Villages, Au Clou, is a village appellation (Côte de Nuits-Villages) with the distinction visible on the labels below.

Though on the surface this seems very complicated, and admittedly it is, the idea behind all these different classifications is to give the wine lover an idea as to what’s in the bottle. In theory, all wines which share a similar classification or name should also share a similar taste profile. The more precise the appellation, the more one should find things in common.

Domaine Rene Bouvier Bourgogne Pinot Noir Le Chapitre 2012 Jean Claude Boisset Côtes De Nuits Village Au Clou 2013

Region, sub-regions and appellations

So let’s start with the difference between region, sub-regions and appellations. A region, simply put, is a large territory which groups together a large number of vineyards. In France, the country is divided into 13 wine producing regions: Alsace, Bordeaux, Beaujolais, Burgundy, Champagne, Charentes, Corsica, Jura-Savoie, Languedoc-Roussillon, Loire Valley, Provence, Rhône Valley, and the South West.

These regions, for the most part, share a relatively similar climate and grow a limited number of grape varieties. But aside from the smallest regions, like Champagne, Burgundy or Beaujolais, where every wine is similar in style – Champagne is always bubbly, Beaujolais is always a red wine made with gamay, and Burgundy is for the most part pinot noir or chardonnay – it’s hard to get more than a very general idea as to what a wine will taste like by looking only at the region.

Louis Roederer Brut Premier ChampagneDomaine Laurent Martray Brouilly Vieilles Vignes 2014Marchand Tawse Pinot Noir Bourgogne 2013 Domaine Vincent Girardin Émotion Des Terroirs 2013

It is when these regions start getting sub-divided that you begin to see more commonality in the wines. These sub-regions group together vineyards which share similar climates and soil types, as well as grow the same grape varieties.

For example, here is how Bordeaux is divided into sub-regions:

Region: Bordeaux

Sub-regions: Médoc, Graves, Libournais, Blayais, Entre-deux-Mers

This sub-dividing continues. Within each sub-region, even smaller vineyard areas are grouped together. Basically, the smaller the sub-region, the more all the vineyards in that area will share similar soils and climates, grow the same grapes, and in theory, produce a similar style and quality of wine.

Continuing with the Bordeaux example, the Médoc sub-region is divided into two smaller sub-regions: Bas Médoc (lower) and Haut-Médoc (upper). Within the Haut-Médoc, there exist six even smaller sub-regions, called communes, which were deemed to have even more similarities from one vineyard to the next: Margaux, Saint-Julien, Saint-Estephe, Pauillac, Listrac-Médoc and Moulis.

Maison Blanche Medoc 2011Louis Roche Grand Listrac 2010

So then what is an appellation? An appellation is a legally defined growing area with distinct rules designed to assure that every winery using the appellation name make a similar style of wine and quality. In France, if a region or sub-region produces what is considered to be distinctively good wine by the Institut national de l’origine et de la qualité (INAO), then the area is granted appellation status.

The appellation d’origine contrôlée (AOC) system was designed to recognize and regulate each of these regions, sub-regions, and if you permit me, sub-sub-regions. So each of these growing areas which have been granted appellation status have rules to follow if the winery wants to use the appellation name on the bottle. You may see the letters AOP rather than AOC in recent vintages. Appellation d’origine protégée (AOP) is the new European classification system, replacing AOC, and essentially meaning the same thing.

Appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) or Appellation d'origine protégée (AOP)

Back to Bordeaux and the Médoc. Each of the sub-regions I listed above are considered an appellation. So if the vineyard is located in the area of the Haut-Médoc, but not in one of the even smaller sub-regions, the wine can be labelled Haut-Médoc AOC. If the vineyard is in, for example, Margaux, then the wine can be labelled Margaux AOC. This is providing the winery follows the rules governing the appellation with respect to grape varieties, yields, and minimum ripeness (alcohol) levels.

So if I am a winery owner in Margaux, the permitted grapes are cabernet sauvignon, merlot, cabernet franc, petit verdot and malbec. If I want to grow syrah, I can, but I cannot use the appellation name Margaux on my label. What I can use however, is another classification called Vin de Pays. While in general this classification denotes lesser quality wine, that is not always the case. The Italian version of this, IGT or Indicazione Geografica Typica, is where one finds Supertuscans, which are Italy’s most expensive wines.

As AOP is becoming the defacto European classification, replacing AOC in France and DOC in Italy, a new streamlined classification called IGP will replace Vin de Pays and IGT.

Once you learn the ABC’s (or AOPs, DOCs, IGPs, etc.) of the wine world, your knowledge of what’s in the bottle will increase, and hopefully your buying and drinking pleasure as well.

 

Bill

“There’s enjoyment to be had of a glass of wine without making it a fetish.” – Frank Prial

Editors Note: You can find Bill’s complete reviews by clicking on any of the highlighted wine names or bottle images above. Premium subscribers to Chacun son vin see all critic reviews immediately. Non-paid members wait 60 days to see newly posted critic reviews. Premium membership has its privileges; like first access to great wines!


Advertisement
Errazuriz Max Reserva Cabernet Sauvignon

Filed under: News, Wine, , , , , , , , , , ,

Les choix de Nadia – Novembre 2015

Soif de savoir
par Nadia Fournier

Nadia Fournier

Nadia Fournier

Chaque année, avant d’entrer dans le vif de la production du Guide du vin, je voyage un peu et je lis beaucoup. Je dévore tout ce qui s’écrit sur l’actualité du vin. Je découvre les nouvelles publications de mes auteurs favoris et revisite les ouvrages intemporels avec lesquels j’ai fait mes premiers pas dans ce monde fascinant.

Chaque année aussi, au hasard des salons des vins, vous êtes nombreux à me confier que vous souhaitez parfaire vos connaissances et approfondir votre savoir dans le domaine du vin. La question qui suit la confidence est presque toujours la même : « par où est-ce que je commence? »

Viennent ensuite : « Quels livres devrait-on lire? Faut-il absolument suivre un cours de sommellerie ? » Et, celle qui, à ma grande surprise, revient le plus fréquemment : « Est-ce à la portée de tous? »

La réponse : bien sûr que oui!

« Z’avez qu’à déguster », comme dirait l’autre. Crachoir et carnet de note à l’appui, si je peux me permettre. Sinon, c’est moins sérieux. D’abord parce qu’on oublie facilement, mais surtout parce que le fait d’écrire nous oblige à mettre en mots les sensations perçues. Donc prenez des notes, même si ça parait laborieux et que ça ne vous dit pas toujours, même si ça vous donne des airs de premier de classe, même si…

Bien se documenter sur les régions viticoles qu’on aborde aide aussi beaucoup à mieux comprendre le style de tel ou tel vin. Au fil des lectures, on s’interroge, on se remet en question, on saisit mieux l’essence du vin et nos propres goûts, accessoirement. Avec un peu de chance, on trouve même des réponses parfois.

Pour vous, chers lecteurs assoiffés de savoir, voici quelques suggestions de livres à dévorer d’un couvert à l’autre ou à feuilleter, au gré des dégustations et des découvertes de nouveaux horizons. Des cadeaux à s’offrir ou à se faire offrir par vos proches qui n’en peuvent déjà plus de vous entendre parler de vin.

Ça tombe bien, les Fêtes approchent… 

POUR DÉCOUVRIR : 

LES RÉGIONS VITICOLES
L'Atlas mondial du vin – 7e édition
L’Atlas mondial du vin – 7e édition
Publié pour la première fois en 1971, L’Atlas mondial du vin du Britannique Hugh Johnson a donné la piqûre à des millions de lecteurs, dont je suis. Traduit en plusieurs langues et maintes fois réédité, cet ouvrage unique fait autorité tant auprès des amateurs que des professionnels, ne serait-ce que par la précision et la qualité de ses cartes géographiques. Depuis la cinquième édition, Hugh Johnson s’est assuré la collaboration de Jancis Robinson, l’une des écrivains les plus prolifiques et elle-même auteur de nombreux livres importants, notamment la titanesque Encyclopédie du vin. La septième édition est totalement remise à jour, enrichie de nouvelles cartes – le livre en compte 215 au total – et demeure LA référence indispensable à tout amateur.
Hugh Johnson, Jancis Robinson, Broquet, 2014, 400 pages, 49,95 $ 

OU LES CÉPAGES
Wine Grapes
Wine Grapes
Fruit des efforts collectifs des journalistes et auteures britanniques Jancis Robinson et Julia Harding accompagnées de José Vouillamoz, botaniste suisse spécialisé en génétique des cépages, cet opus que certains geeks surnomment « la bible des cépages » a créé une petite commotion dans le monde du vin dès sa sortie. Wine Grapes n’est pourtant pas le premier livre traitant d’ampélographie, la science qui étudie la vigne. Mais contrairement à leurs prédécesseurs, les auteurs de Wine Grapes ont pu compter sur des technologies avancées pour examiner la vigne sous un angle nouveau. Leur étude, étayée sur des analyses d’ADN, dresse un portrait exhaustif de la biodiversité viticole et répertorie 1380 cépages vitis vinifera. Publié exclusivement en anglais pour le moment, ce pavé de près de trois kilos a permis de réfuter plusieurs croyances quant aux origines réelles de certains cépages.

Le livre raconte aussi les différentes migrations des cépages pendant la colonisation du Nouveau Monde et nous conduit jusqu’aux plus lointaines ou profondes racines de la viticulture, dans le sud-est de la Turquie. Un ouvrage un peu pointu certes, mais toujours fascinant à consulter.

Jancis Robinson, Julia Harding, José Vouillamoz, ECCO PRESS, 2012, 1242 pages, 185,00 $ 

Une histoire mondiale du vinPOUR LE FÉRU D’HISTOIRE

Une histoire mondiale du vin – De l’Antiquité à nos jours

Le vin fait partie de l’héritage culturel des peuples. Traduit en français et publié en format de poche, un merveilleux ouvrage à ranger parmi les grands classiques. Avec son style inimitable et très vivant, Hugh Johnson retrace l’histoire du vin et la création des grands crus au fil des siècles. Passionnant comme un roman.
Hugh Johnson, Hachette, Collection Pluriel, 1990, 684 pages, 22,95 $. 

POUR LE NÉOPHYTE

Le vin en 30 secondes

Le vin en 30 secondesLa vaste collection 30 secondes (religions, Rome Antique, Shakespeare, psychologie, politique, théories économiques, etc,) s’enrichit d’un ouvrage sur le vin. Sous la direction de Gérard Basset, meilleur sommelier du monde en 2010, ce livre offre un survol de la plupart des aspects du vin, décortiqués et résumés en plus ou moins 300 mots. Britannique d’origine française, Basset propose des lexiques et des explications concises pour mieux comprendre la viticulture et l’élaboration des différents types de vin, un survol des cépages et appellations les mieux connus, des précisions sur le dioxyde de soufre, l’histoire du vin, la dégustation, la santé, etc. En plus de quelques portraits d’acteurs majeurs du monde du vin. Un très bel ouvrage de vulgarisation.
Gérard Basset OBE, Hurtubise, 2015, 160 pages, 21,95 $. 

POUR APPRENDRE EN S’AMUSANT

Les Incollables – VinLes Incollables – Vin
Un jeu-questionnaire sur le vin concocté par l’illustre sommelière Véronique Rivest, dans la collection Les Incollables. On y trouve autant de questions historiques et culturelles que techniques. Une très bonne idée de cadeau pour les amateurs de vin qui souhaitent parfaire leurs connaissances générales.
Véronique Rivest, Caractère, 2014, 14,95 $ 

OU SUR LES BANCS D’ÉCOLE 

Ateliers SAQ par l’ITHQ
À compter de janvier 2016, la SAQ, en collaboration avec l’ITHQ (Institut de Tourisme et d’Hôtellerie du Québec), offrira sept cours dédiés au monde des vins et des spiritueux. D’abord un cours d’initiation à la dégustation du vin, nommé Vins 101, de même qu’une série de cours thématiques (cépages, vins de France, vins d’Italie, bulles, etc.) qui se tiendront à Montréal, Québec, Laval, Longueuil, Trois-Rivières, Sherbrooke, Gatineau et Sainte-Adèle. Ce nouveau volet éducatif comporte aussi des ateliers d’accords vins et mets, qui seront offerts exclusivement à Montréal, ainsi que des ateliers privés pour les groupes de particuliers et pour les entreprises. 

La pratique maintenant ! 

De Bordeaux à l’Afrique du Sud, avec un petit détour par les îles méditerranéennes – et pas juste parce c’est joli – une poignée de bons vins pour élargir vos horizons (non pas que je les crois limités) et mettre les acquis en pratique. Parce que la pratique, quand il est question de vin, c’est tellement agréable! 

Propriété du groupe Taillan (Châteaux Ferrière, Gruaud-Larose, Chasse-Spleen et Haut-Bages-Libéral), ce cru bourgeois situé près de Margaux est lui aussi administré par Céline Villars. En 2005, on a produit un excellent second vin sous l’étiquette Moulins de Citran. Parfaitement ouvert et prêt à boire, mais pas fatigué pour autant. À boire au cours de la prochaine année. (27,75 $) 

Tout au nord, dans la magnifique région d’Alsace, la famille Barthelmé produit le Pinot Gris 2012 Cuvée Albert (28 $), issu de vignes âgées de près de 40 ans, conduites en agriculture biologique. Aucune lourdeur malgré un reste de sucre, mais une texture grasse et rassasiante. Le vin idéal pour accompagner les fromages puissants et coulants.

Château Citran Moulins de Citran 2005 Domaine Albert Mann Pinot Gris Cuvée Albert 2012 Domaine Ferrer Ribière Les Centenaires 2013 Altaroses Joan d'Anguera Montsant 2013

Nettement plus jeune, vigoureux et enveloppé de tanins mûrs, le Carignan 2013, Les Centenaires de Denis Ferrer et de Bruno Ribière est issu, comme son nom l’indique, de vignes centenaires de carignan. Un très bel exemple de la générosité contenue des meilleurs vins des Côtes Catalanes. (19,85 $)

De l’autre côté des Pyrénées, la région de Montsant ceinture le Priorat et ses vins sont souvent des alternatives économiques à ceux de son illustre voisin. En prenant la relève du domaine familial, Joan et Josep d’Anguera ont converti le vignoble à la biodynamie et progressivement délaissé la syrah au profit de la garnatxa (grenache). L’Altaroses 2013, Montsant (21,90 $) illustre à merveille le nouvel esprit du domaine. Un grenache d’une grande « buvabilité », ce qui n’est pas le cas de tous les vins produits dans cette région espagnole.

La majorité des cépages de la Sardaigne sont originaires d’Espagne. Ça s’explique assez facilement quand on sait que l’île, aujourd’hui italienne, était sous la juridiction du royaume d’Aragon pendant près de quatre siècles, de 1323 à 1720. Force majeure du vignoble sarde, la maison Argiolas met uniquement à profit ces cépages « locaux ». Le Costera Cannonau di Sardegna 2013 est composé de cannonau (grenache), de bovale sardo (graciano) et de carignan. Encore très jeune, il offre beaucoup pour le prix. (18,90 $)

Toujours au cœur de la Méditerranée, mais un peu plus à l’est, sur l’île de Santorin. Si vous croyez que tous les blancs se ressemblent, il vous faut absolument goûter les assyrtikos d’Harydimos Hatzidakis, particulièrement la cuvée Mylos 2014, Santorin. Un vin d’une envergure immense qui ne cesse d’évoluer dans le verre. N’hésitez pas à l’aérer longuement en carafe. 12338834   (45,50$)

Argiolas Costera 2013 Ktima Hatzidakis Assyrtiko de Mylos 2014 Secateurs Badenhorst Chenin Blanc 2013 Klein Constantia Vin de Constance 2009

Quelques dizaines de milliers de kilomètres plus au sud, le cépage chenin blanc a été implanté dès le 17e siècle par les huguenots qui trouvèrent refuge en Afrique du Sud. Élaboré dans le même esprit de légèreté et de buvabilité que le Red Bend de la gamme Sécateur, le Chenin blanc 2014 d’Adi Badenhorst est l’un des bons vins blancs sud-africain sur le marché. Une belle porte d’entrée pour saisir le potentiel de la région viticole de Swartland.  (18,05 $) 

Enfin, terminons ce tour d’horizon sur une note sublime avec le Klein Constantia, Vin de Constance 2009. En reprenant ce domaine historique en 1980, la famille Jooste a fait revivre ce vin légendaire dont raffolaient les riches et les puissants d’Europe aux XVIIIe et XIXe siècles, jusqu’à ce que le phylloxéra mette fin à sa production. Toujours issu à 100 % de muscat à petits grains et doté d’une richesse exceptionnelle, le 2009 est un vin hors du commun. Une bouteilles unique, à goûter au moins une fois dans une vie. (65,50 $ – 500 ml)

À la vôtre!

Nadia Fournier

Note de la rédaction: Cet accès exclusif, ainsi que la possibilité de lire dès leur publication tous les commentaires de dégustation publiés sur Chacun son Vin, est offert à nos membres Privilège pour la somme de 40 $ par année. (Les membres inscrits bénéficiant d’un accès gratuit doivent, pour leur part, attendre 60 jours avant de pouvoir accéder à tout notre contenu.)


Publicité
Wolf Blass Gold Label Shiraz 2012
Le guide du vin

Filed under: News, Wine, , , , , , , ,

Les choix de Nadia – Octobre 2015

Une petite vague, avant le raz-de-marée
par Nadia Fournier

Nadia Fournier - New - Cropped

Nadia Fournier

Tous les ans, au sortir de la rédaction du Guide du vin, les gens autour de moi s’enthousiasment : «tu vas enfin pouvoir prendre des vacances! »

Je veux bien, mais comment ?

De toutes les saisons, l’automne est certainement la plus follement occupée dans le milieu du commerce du vin. Chaque semaine, des dizaines d’acteurs de l’industrie visitent le Québec pour rencontrer les dirigeants de la SAQ et les employés en succursales, les chroniqueurs, les consommateurs aussi, de plus en plus, et leur faire découvrir leurs vins.

Chaque semaine jusqu’à Noël, les lettres circulaires diffusées par la SAQ sont de plus en plus garnies. Une foule de noms connus, une foule d’inconnus aussi. C’est presque à vous donner le tournis. Mais qui s’en plaindrait?

Dans les semaines suivantes, en amont de la Grande Dégustation de Montréal, dont le pays invité cette année est l’Espagne, attendez vous à une déferlante de nouvelles étiquettes espagnoles (Passez nous voir au kiosque# G02). Il n’y aura pas que du bon, si je me fie à ce que j’ai goûté en préparation du guide, mais il y aura de très très belles additions au répertoire. D’excellents vins de Montsant, de Galice, de Bierzo, de la Rioja, entre autres.

En attendant que ces belles bouteilles arrivent sur les tablettes, une partie du relâchement Cellier de ce jeudi est dédié à l’Espagne. Pour le reste, de très bons, voire excellents vins d’Autriche. Un rouge et deux blancs pour redécouvrir sous un jour qualitatif, ce pays viticole qui a connu une véritable révolution depuis la crise de l’antigel des années 1980. Et, bonne nouvelle, contrairement à ceux de l’Allemagne, qui contiennent un certain reste de sucre, la plupart des vins blancs d’Autriche sont parfaitement secs.

Comme celui de Michael et Eva Moosbrugger, qui commercialisent, sous la gamme Domaene Gobelsburg, des vins de consommation courante, destinés à être bus jeunes. Particulièrement sec et nerveux en 2014, le Grüner Veltliner Niederösterreich est la bouteille tout indiquée pour un l’apéro et pour les huîtres.  (17,05 $) 

Geyerhof compte parmi les pionniers de la viticulture biologique dans le Kremstal et en Autriche. Le vignoble de la famille Maier est maintenant conduit en biodynamie et donne un excellent Grüner Veltliner 2012, Rosensteig, Kremstal d’une grande pureté, d’une réelle élégance. Beaucoup de relief, de prestance et de persistance en bouche, même si tout se dessine avec délicatesse et subtilité. (23,95 $)

Domæne Gobelsburg Grüner Veltliner 2014 Weingut Geyerhof Rosensteig Grüner Veltliner 2012 Weingut Pittnauer Gmbh Zweigelt Heideboden 2013 Domaine Rijckaert Mâcon Villages 2013

Situé en bordure du lac de Neusiedl, à l’extrémité orientale de l’Autriche, tout près de la frontière hongroise, le vignoble de Gerhard Pittnauer est maintenant converti à l’agriculture biologique. Peu bavard à l’ouverture, le Zweigelt 2013, Heideboden, Burgenland encore vibrant de jeunesse bénéficie d’une longue aération en carafe qui le rend nettement plus volubile. Beaucoup de caractère, des saveurs nettes et franches et une bonne tenue en bouche. À ce prix, on ne se trompe pas!   (20,30 $) 

En route vers l’Espagne, mais avant, un petit arrêt par la Bourgogne. Établis depuis 1998 sur la commune de Leynes, au sud-ouest de Mâcon, Régine et Jean Rijckaert se consacrent avec beaucoup de succès à l’élaboration de chardonnay, tant en Bourgogne, que dans le Jura. Leur Mâcon Villages 2013 mise avant tout sur l’expression fruitée du chardonnay, mis en valeur par un bon usage du bois. (24,40 $)  

La vague espagnole (enfin, un début) 

Bien qu’il soit composé de godello à 100 %, le Godello 2014 Gaba do Xil Valdeorras de Telmo Rodriguez évoque presque sauvignon blanc, au nez comme en bouche. Bon vin d’apéritif, parfumé, net et vif, à défaut d’être aussi distinctif que par le passé. (17,25 $)

Telmo Rodríguez démontre davantage son talent à produire des vins de facture moderne, mais fidèles à leurs origines, avec le Mencía 2013, Gaba do Xil, Valdeorras. À l’ouverture, on note une légère réduction, qui s’estompe rapidement avec l’aération. Pour le reste, un très bon vin coulant, plein de fruit et savoureux. (18,45 $) 

Telmo Rodríguez Gaba do Xil Godello 2014 Gaba do Xil Mencía 2013 Finca Villacreces Pruno 2013

J’avais beaucoup aimé le 2011, commenté l’an dernier, mais je suis restée perplexe devant le Pruno 2013, Ribera del Duero. Fortement marqué par l’élevage, avec un nez fumé et torréfié, le vin déploie cependant une matière fruitée très dense qui permet d’être optimiste quant à son avenir. À revoir dans un an ou deux. (22,45 $)

Peut-être a t-il été mal servi par le contexte d’une dégustation technique, mais le Flor d’Englora 2011 de Baronia del Monsant ne m’a pas spécialement emballée. Dégusté à deux reprises cet été, le vin n’a rien de défectueux, mais s’avèrait timide, frôlant la minceur. À ce prix, je lui préfère nettement le Tinto 2013 Castro Ventosa. (14,95 $) 

La CVNE – Compania Vinicola del Norte de España. Prononcer « cou-ni » – commercialise un bon Rioja Gran Reserva 2009 dont le nez et la bouche mêlent les notes caractéristiques de chêne américain aux goûts de fruits secs, mais qui m’a semblé un peu étriqué et court en bouche. Rien à voir avec l’envergure du Gran Reserva Imperial 2009 qui arrivera en succursales en novembre. (29,95 $) 

Baronia del Montsant Flor D'englora Garnatxa 2011 Castro Ventosa Tinto 2013 Cune Gran Reserva 2009 Beronia Reserva 2010

Enfin, pour terminer sur une note plus positive, j’ai bien aimé le Reserva 2010, Rioja de Beronia. Un bon vin typique de son appellation, dans lequel le bois joue un rôle de premier plan, au nez comme en bouche, ce qui ne l’empêche pas d’être harmonieux. Déjà ouvert, il tiendra facilement jusqu’en 2018. (21,50 $)

À la vôtre!

Nadia Fournier


Présentation dela fonction CELLIER

Nouvel arrivage CELLIERAfin de vous guider encore mieux dans vous achats et faciliter vos emplettes, nous avons ajouté une fonction spéciale au site Chacun son vin pour nos membres Privilège.

Chaque fois que la SAQ met en vente ces nouveaux arrivages, vous n’aurez qu’à visiter notre site et cliquer sur l’onglet «Vin» puis sur «Nouvel arrivage CELLIER», dans le menu déroulant. Aussi simple que cela !

Vous pourrez ainsi lire mes notes de dégustation sur tous les vins du CELLIER, en un seul et même endroit.

 

CELLIER d’octobre

Note de la rédaction: Cet accès exclusif, ainsi que la possibilité de lire dès leur publication tous les commentaires de dégustation publiés sur Chacun son Vin, est offert à nos membres Privilège pour la somme de 40 $ par année. (Les membres inscrits bénéficiant d’un accès gratuit doivent, pour leur part, attendre 60 jours avant de pouvoir accéder à tout notre contenu.)


Publicité
19 Crimes - arrosez votre curiosité

Filed under: News, Wine, , , , , , , ,

Les choix de Nadia – Septembre 2015

Vive la France !
par Nadia Fournier

Nadia Fournier - New - Cropped

Nadia Fournier

C’est le mois de septembre, le mois de la rentrée et, comme chaque année, c’est le mois de la France à la SAQ. D’abord, plusieurs vins français inscrits au répertoire général sont en promotion jusqu’au 27 septembre dans le cadre de la Foire aux vins français. Peu de nouveautés ni de grands vins, mais quelques valeurs sûres, comme le Benjamin Brunel Rasteau, le Terrasses de Mayline de la Cave de Roquebrun, le Tradition du Château Montauriol et le Pouilly-Fuissé de Jean-Claude Boisset. Pour ne nommer que ceux là.

Le Cellier du mois de septembre est aussi consacré essentiellement aux vins de l’hexagone. Parmi les bons achats à faire, plusieurs vins du Languedoc, quelques belles découvertes de la vallée du Rhône et une dizaine de bons bordeaux, abordables, pour la plupart.

Languedoc

Château Maris, Minervois-La Livinière 2011, Natural Selection Biodynamic
Un nez très typé du Languedoc, entre le fruit confit et la réglisse, le cuir et la garrigue. Solidement constitué, le vin est largement marqué par les arômes de la syrah, à laquelle il emprunte aussi la densité tannique. Finale chaleureuse et bonne longueur. (22,05 $)

Domaine St-Jean de la Gineste, Corbières 2013, Carte Blanche
Toujours un peu plus austère que la moyenne des corbières sur le marché, ce vin ne se livre pas à la première gorgée. La bouche est stricte, mêlant les notes animales et fruitées. Beaucoup de caractère pour le prix. (16,95 $)

Syrah Château Maris Natural Selection Biodynamic 2011 Domaine St Jean De La Gineste Corbières Carte Blanche 2013 Château Fontenelles Cuvée Renaissance Corbières 2012 Domaine L'ostal Cazes Grand Vin 2011

Château Fontenelles, Corbières 2012, Cuvée Renaissance
Jeune et encore un peu nerveux, avec un léger reste de gaz. Bien tourné, sans lourdeur. Le bois apporte aussi une certaine onctuosité et une texture crémeuse. À boire d’ici 2020. (20,50 $)

Domaine L’Ostal Cazes, Minervois-La Livinière 2011, Grand Vin
En plus de diriger avec brio ses propriétés médocaines (Lynch Bages, Les Ormes de Pez), Jean-Michel Cazes a acquis en 2002 deux domaines voisins à la Livinière, dans le Minervois. Ce n’est donc pas un hasard si on retrouve dans ce 2011, une signature toute bordelaise. Bon minervois de facture moderne, aux tanins soyeux et polis, mis en valeur par un usage intelligent du bois de chêne. Élégant et très bien tourné dans son genre. À boire jusqu’en 2019. (28,30 $)

Vallée du Rhône

Domaine Santa Duc, Les Quatre Terres, Côtes du Rhône 2012
Très peu flatteur lorsque goûté en août dernier aux bureaux de la SAQ, ce côtes-du-rhône s’est avéré plus charmant lorsque dégusté plus posément à la maison et sur trois journées consécutives. Un bon vin méridional, qui traverse en ce moment une phase ingrate. À laisser reposer quelques mois en cave. (19,60 $)

Domaine de Beaurenard, Rasteau 2012, Les Argiles Bleues
En plus de somptueux châteauneufs, les frères Coulon élaborent, sur cette propriété de Rasteau, des vins rouges sérieux dont le potentiel de garde ne fait aucun doute. On retrouve dans ce 2012 l’élégance et le poli habituels de Beaurenard. Très bon rasteau qui gagnera à reposer en cave jusqu’en 2017. (29,30 $)

Domaine Santa Duc Les Quatre Terres 2012Domaine De Beaurenard Les Argiles Bleues 2012Michel Gassier Les Piliers Viognier 2014Clos Bellane Les Échalas 2012

Gassier, Michel; Viognier 2014, Les Piliers, Vin de France
Le propriétaire du Château de Nages produit aussi, sous une étiquette éponyme, une syrah et un bon viognier, floral comme il se doit avec une agréable sensation de fraîcheur en bouche. (19,95 $)

Clos Bellane, Côtes-du-Rhône-Villages 2012, Les Échalas
Stéphane Vedeau a acquis cette propriété située sur le plateau de Vinsobres en 2010. Le vignoble est certifié en agriculture biologique à compter de cette année. L’orientation et l’altitude du vignoble – juché à 400 mètres et tourné vers l’est – et la composition calcaire des sols expliquent peut-être l’équilibre de cette cuvée de marsanne et de roussanne. (31 $) 

Sud-Ouest et Bordeaux 

Hours, Charles; Jurançon sec 2013, Cuvée Marie
Depuis 20 ans, le vigneron Charles Hours est une référence de l’appellation Jurançon au cœur du Béarn. Non seulement ses vins doux sont-ils irréprochables, mais son Jurançon sec Cuvée Marie est d’une rare élégance. Un vin de texture qu’on peut aisément laisser reposer en cave jusqu’en 2020. (23,50 $)

Château Hanteillan, Haut-Médoc 2009
Plus enrobé que le 2010, que j’avais trouvé un peu osseux. Les tanins sont fermes, mais bien mûrs, témoins de la nature généreuse du millésime à Bordeaux. Bon rapport qualité-prix. (24 $)

Cuvée Marie Jurançon Sec 2013 Château Hanteillan 2009 Château Malescasse 2009 Château Coutet 2010

Château Malescasse, Haut-Médoc 2009
Un très joli nez, expressif et parfumé, annonce un vin déjà ouvert et poli par quelques années d’élevage. Très bon cru bourgeois offrant un rapport qualité-prix attrayant. (30,75 $)

Château Coutet, Saint-Émilion Grand Cru 2010
Encore jeune et grossé à gros traits, mais non moins savoureux, ce bon 2010 se fait valoir par son ampleur en bouche et par ses goûts généreux de fruits noirs. Un st-émilion passablement charnu, mis en valeur par une saine acidité qui accentue sa vigueur tannique. (35,25 $)

Les petits prix

Enfin, les quatre vins suivants ont été mis en marché à la fin du moins d’août, dans le cadre de la promotion « Les petits prix doux Cellier ». Tous d’excellents rapports qualité-prix pour accompagner les soirs de semaine.

Domaine de la Ragotière, Sauvignon Blanc 2013, Val de Loire
Stylistiquement à mi-chemin entre un sauvignon blanc du Centre-Loire et un muscadet, un très bon vin léger, frais et aromatique, aux goûts caractéristiques de citron, de lime et d’herbes fraîches. Le genre de bouteille que l’amateur de sauvignon blanc devrait toujours avoir en réserve au frigo. (14,85 $) 

Marianne Vineyard, Selena 2013, Western Cape
Le Bordelais Christian Dauriac (Châteaux Destieux et La Clémence) a aquis cette propriété sur les flancs du Simonsberg, tout près de Stellenbosch; l’œnologue Michel Rolland consulte et élabore ce bon vin de consommation courante composé de cabernet sauvignon, de syrah, de merlot et de pinotage. Du corps, du fruit, aucune sucrosité et une présence en bouche rassasiante. (14,95 $)

Domaine De La Ragotière Sauvignon Blanc 2013 Selena Marianne Vineyard 2013 San Fabiano Calcinaia Casa Boschino 2013 Castro Ventosa Tinto 2013

San Fabiano Calcinaia, Casa Boschino 2013, Toscana
Très bon vin issu de l’agriculture biologique, donnent un typiquement toscan par sa vigueur tannique, son acidité et ses bons goûts de fruits noirs et de cuir. Très bon achat à ce prix. (14,70 $) 

Castro Ventosa, Mencía Tinto 2013, Bierzo
Qualité appréciable pour un vin de cette gamme de prix. Rien de complexe, mais un bon vin conçu pour la table, à la fois chaleureux et doté d’une certaine austérité fort attrayante. (15,90 $)

Présentation dela fonction CELLIER

Nouvel arrivage CELLIERAfin de vous guider encore mieux dans vous achats et faciliter vos emplettes, nous avons ajouté une fonction spéciale au site Chacun son vin pour nos membres Privilège.

Chaque fois que la SAQ met en vente ces nouveaux arrivages, vous n’aurez qu’à visiter notre site et cliquer sur l’onglet «Vin» puis sur «Nouvel arrivage CELLIER», dans le menu déroulant. Aussi simple que cela !

Vous pourrez ainsi lire mes notes de dégustation sur tous les vins du CELLIER, en un seul et même endroit.

À la vôtre!

Nadia Fournier

CELLIER – le 3 et 17 septembre

~

Note de la rédaction: Cet accès exclusif, ainsi que la possibilité de lire dès leur publication tous les commentaires de dégustation publiés sur Chacun son Vin, est offert à nos membres Privilège pour la somme de 40 $ par année. (Les membres inscrits bénéficiant d’un accès gratuit doivent, pour leur part, attendre 60 jours avant de pouvoir accéder à tout notre contenu.)


Publicité
19 Crimes - arrosez votre curiosité

Filed under: News, Wine, , , , , , , ,

@WineAlign

WineAlign Reviews

Coldstream Hills Pinot Noir 2008